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Province of Fryslân/Friesland (Fr)
 

Click on any of the following links to find out more about churches in cities and villages in Fryslân:

Places are mentioned by their official names. Links in bold refer to pages showing a selection of churches in specific towns, villages or municipalities (these are marked "mun."), all others refer directly to descriptions of a specific church. For an overview of all churches in Fryslân that are described in more detail on Archimon see the pictorial index.)
 

Blauwhuis
Blije
Boazum
Bolsward

Burgum
Damwoude
Dantumadeel (mun.)
Dearsum
Dokkum

Dongeradeel (mun.)
Dronrijp

Easterlittens
Exmorra

Ferwerderadiel (mun.)
Ferwert

Goutum
Grou
Hallum
Hantum
Hantumhuizen
Harlingen

Heeg
Hegebeintum
Hijum

Holwerd
Janum
Jelsum

Jistrum
Jorwert

Kollum
Leeuwarden

Lemmer
Nijland
Oudega
Rinsumageest
Sint Nicolaasga

Sneek
Stiens
Súdwest Fryslân (mun.)
Westergeest
Wetsens
Wommels
Workum

Woudsend
Wouterswoude

Although in most of the Netherlands known as Friesland, Fryslân, as it is called in the Frisian language, is the official name for this northern province. The oldest information about this province dates from the first century, when the Frisians were allies, although tributary, of the Romans, whose empire had the river Rhine as its border. The Frisians populated the area east and north of this river, including parts of the current Germany. Other Germanic tribes moved to this area in the next few centuries, with the Saxons being of great influence in the east and the Francs in the south. The Francish kings sent several missionaries to christianize the Frisians and expanded their empire with parts of Frisian territory. In the 11th century Friesland had become part of the German empire. Gradually it was divided, with a part becoming increasingly Saxon (the current province of Groningen), which seperates the current Fryslân from what is now the German province of Ost-Friesland. In 1288 arch-enemy Holland conquered West-Friesland, which was seperated from the rest of Friesland by the Zuiderzee. The remaining Friesland managed to withstand every invasion, until in 1524 Charles V added the province to his empire. It remained a rebellious province, one of the first to resist the power of the Spanish Habsburgs. After 1576 Spain lost the province, which was now ruled by a stadtholder from the Oranje-Nassau family. Under Orangist rule the province became strictly calvinistic, although in several places catholic minorities managed to survive. Many Frisian noblemen left Friesland to live in Holland, from where they ruled their belongings. The Republic brought the province a long period of economic decay and stagnation. Up to this day Friesland is still largely agricultural, albeit with eleven towns and cities, of which the capital Leeuwarden is the biggest.

   
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