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Province of Noord-Brabant (NB)
 

Click on any of the following links to find out more about churches in cities and villages in Noord-Brabant:

(Links in bold refer to pages showing a selection of churches in specific towns, villages or municipalities (these are marked "mun."), all others refer directly to descriptions of a single church. For an overview of all churches in Noord-Brabant that are described in more detail on Archimon see the pictorial index.

Aarle-Rixtel
Alphen
Beek en Donk
Bergeijk (mun.)
Bergen op Zoom (mun.)
Berkel-Enschot
Best
Beugen
Bladel (mun.)

Boxmeer (mun.)
Boxtel (mun.)
Breda (mun.)
Cromvoirt
Demen
Dennenburg
Dieden
Diessen
Dongen

Drimmelen (mun.)
Eersel (mun.)
Eindhoven
Etten-Leur
Geertruidenberg (mun.)
Geldrop-Mierlo (mun.)
Goirle (mun.)
Grave (mun.)
Halderberge (mun.)
Halsteren
Heerle
Heeze
Helmond
Helvoirt
's-Hertogenbosch

Heusden (mun.)
Hilvarenbeek
Hoeven
Hooge Zwaluwe
Hoogeloon
Laarbeek (mun.)
Lage Mierde
Lage Zwaluwe
Leende
Lierop
Loo
Loon op Zand

Made (mun.)
Meierijstad (mun.)
Noordhoek
Nuenen
Oirschot (mun.)
Oisterwijk
Oosterhout (mun.)
Oploo
Oss (mun.)

Oudenbosch
Raamsdonk
Ravenstein
Reusel-De Mierden (mun.)
Sambeek
Sint Anthonis (mun.)
Sint-Michielsgestel

Sint-Oedenrode
Sint Willebrord
Sprang-Capelle
Steenbergen

Terheijden
Tilburg (mun.)
Uden
Udenhout
Valkenswaard (mun.)
Veghel
Veldhoven (mun.)
Vught
Waalre
Waalwijk (mun.)
Weebosch
Woudrichem (mun.)
Zundert

Province in the south of the country. Largest cities are 's-Hertogenbosch (provincial capital), Eindhoven, Tilburg and Breda. Until recently this was a predominantly catholic and agricultural province. To a large extent the current province has its roots in the old duchy of Brabant. In the west were two manorials with a relatively big autonomy, the Marquisate of Bergen op Zoom and the Barony of Breda, while the east belonged to the Meierij of 's-Hertogenbosch, which remained the unquestioned territory of the duke, although the area was divided in four sections (Kwartieren), each ruled by a nobleman in name of the duke. With the partition of the Netherlands in a northern and a southern part in 1648, the new border ran over the territory of the former duchy. The northern part of Brabant came under the rule of the Republic and was ruled as a colony directly from Holland, while the south of Brabant remained a flourishing part of the Habsburg empire, first under Spanish, later under Austrian rule. In 1795, thanks to an invasion by the French, equal rights were restored to the citizens of this part of Brabant and the region Bataafs-Brabant ("Batavian Brabant") was formed. When most of the Northern and Southern Netherlands were reunited again from 1815 until 1830, the old Brabant was not, but remained partitioned into various provinces, including Noord-Brabant. The current province however is a little more than just the northern part of the former duchy of Brabant. In the north two former parts of Holland were added to its territory. These were the regions Land van Heusden and Altena, with towns such as Werkendam and Woudrichem, and the Langstraat, with towns like Geertruidenberg and Heusden. These two regions form the predominantly protestant northern part of the province. From the province of Zeeland came a tiny part with the village of Nieuw-Vossemeer. Furthermore, a few former enclaves in the east were added to the new province. These were the territories of Bokhoven, Megen, Ravenstein, Uden, Gemert and Boxmeer, all of which had managed to stay outside the Republic until the French occupation of 1795 and had known freedom of religion, resulting in a surviving catholic culture there. Excluded from the province of Noord-Brabant are a few small enclaves in the mid-south of the province, which together are called Baarle-Hertog and belong to Belgium.

   
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