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Province of Overijssel (Ov)
 

Click on any of the following links to find out more about churches in cities and villages in Overijssel:

(Links in bold refer to pages showing a selection of churches in specific towns, villages or municipalities (these are marked "mun."), all others refer directly to descriptions of a single church. For an overview of all churches in Overijssel that are described in more detail on Archimon see the pictorial index.)

Almelo (mun.)
Borne (mun.)
Bornerbroek
Dalfsen (mun.)
Delden
Denekamp
Deventer (mun.)
Dinkelland (mun.)
Enschede (mun.)
Enter
Geesteren
Goor
Haaksbergen (mun.)
Heeten
Hellendoorn
Hengelo
Hertme
Hof van Twente (mun.)
Ijsselmuiden
Kampen (mun.)
Lattrop
Lemelerveld
Lierderholthuis
Lonneker
Losser
Mariaparochie
Nieuw-Heeten
Oldenzaal
Ootmarsum
Raalte (mun.)
Rijssen
St. Isidorushoeve
Steenwijk
Tilligte
Tubbergen (mun.)
Vasse
Weerselo
Wierden (mun.)
Zwolle

Overijssel is known under that name since the 15th century. Before that it was called Oversticht. Under Charlemagne the area, which was populated by Saxons, was conquered while a start was made with the christianization of the population by missionaries from Utrecht. Between 1040 and 1049 emperor Henry III gave the regions of Twente, Salland and Hamaland to bishop Bernoldus of Utrecht in possession. By the end of the 11th century all of the current Overijssel was ruled by the bishop. Regular wars with Gelre occasionally resulted in the loss of territory. In the 12th century Oversticht was seperated from the heartland of the diocese (Nedersticht) when Gelre conquered the Veluwe region. The power of the bishop was constantly challenged by the cities of Deventer, Kampen and Zwolle, all members of the Hanseatic League. In the rest of Oversticht there were no cities of much importance. In 1528 the bishop of Utrecht lost all of his temporal power to emperor Charles V. In 1559 Deventer became the capital of a new diocese. In 1580 however a protestant army forced Overijssel to join the alliance against Spain, the Union of Utrecht. Starting in the three cities on the river Ijssel, the province gradually became more protestant, except for the region of Twente, which remained in Spanish hands until 1626 and stayed mostly catholic. An invasion by troops from Münster brought Overijssel back in the German empire from 1672 until 1674. The French period from 1795 until 1814 brought along several territorial and temporary name changes. In 1814 Overijssel became part of the kingdom of the Netherlands.
   


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