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Province of Limburg (L)
 

Click on any of the following links to find out more about churches in cities and villages in Limburg:

(Links in bold refer to pages showing a selection of churches in specific towns, villages or municipalities (these are marked "mun."), all others refer to descriptions of a single church only. For an overview of all churches in Limburg that are described on Archimon see the pictorial index.)

Altweerterheide
Arcen
Asselt
Baexem
Beek
Berg en Terblijt
Bleijerheide
Bocholtz
Broekhuizenvorst
Brunssum
Echt-Susteren (mun.)
Eckelrade
Eijsden-Margraten (mun.)
Eygelshoven
Eys
Geleen
Geulle
Grathem
Gronsveld
Groot Genhout
Grubbenvorst
Gulpen-Wittem (mun.)
Heel
Heerlen (mun.)
Hoensbroek
Holset
Holtum
Horst aan de Maas (mun.)
Houthem-St. Gerlach
Jabeek
Kerkrade
Kessel
Klimmen
Koningsbosch
Kronenberg
Landgraaf (mun.)
Lemiers
Leudal (mun.)
Limbricht
Linne
Maasgouw (mun.)

Maastricht
Margraten
Mechelen
Meerssen (mun.)
Meijel
Melderslo
Merselo
Mesch
Mheer
Mook
Neeritter
Nieuwenhagen
Nieuwenhagerheide
Nieuwstadt
Nijswiller
Noorbeek
Oirsbeek
Panningen
Pey
Reuver
Roermond
Rothem
Schaesberg
Sevenum
Sint Geertruid
Sittard-Geleen (mun.)
Stein
St. Odiliënberg
Susteren
Thorn
Ubach over Worms
Vaals (mun.)
Valkenburg (mun.)
Venlo
Vijlen
Voerendaal
Weert
Wessem

The current province of Limburg has a long history and has been permanently inhabited for several thousands of years. During the Roman empire settlements were founded that later became such cities as Maastricht and Heerlen. In the 12th century the Duchy of Limburg covered part of the south of the current province it was named after. For most of the region's history it was divided by many masters. While the Duchy of Brabant ruled parts in the south, much of the north belonged to Gelre. After the 80-Years War the northern part remained in Spanish hands, while the south became an enclave under the rule of the Republic. In this area itself were several Spanish, later Austrian, and German enclaves. In 1713 Prussia got a part of the north as well. Until in 1794 French troops invaded the province it consisted of 18 principalities. In 1798 France annexed the entire region. In 1815 it became part of the newly founded Kingdom of the Netherlands. To preserve the memory of the long vanished Duchy a new province was founded with the name of Limburg. Already in 1839 the province was divided between Belgium and the Netherlands. Large parts of what became the Dutch province of Limburg had been part of Belgium from 1830 until 1839, including the city of Roermond. The involuntary incorporation in the Netherlands was felt by the population as an occupation for a long time. When in 1853 the diocese of Roermond was re-established it covered the same territory as the province, which meant a great deal for the unification of Limburg. In the final months of World War Two the northern and central part of the province suffered from heavy fighting. Germany annexed parts of the province for several months.
Unlike people in most of the rest of the Netherlands, Limburgers have a strong sense of attachment to their province. Recently Limburgish was recognized as a seperate language.